Wednesday, 19 December, 2018

Astronaut Crew Scheduled to Handle SpaceX Spacecraft Operations Reaches ISS

Russia launches first manned voyage to ISS since rocket accident Crew from aborted Soyuz mission to get second chance at ISS mission
Theresa Hayes | 05 December, 2018, 18:32

A Russian Soyuz spacecraft carrying three astronauts successfully docked with the International Space Station on Monday following a clean launch from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan six hours earlier. This is the first manned Soyuz launch since the October 11 failure that caused Aleksey Ovchinin and Nick Hague to make an emergency landing minutes after liftoff.

It is reported by Roscosmos on Monday, December 3, reports the Chronicle.info with reference to the Correspondent.

Members of ISS Expedition 58, which includes Sergey Prokopyev (Roscosmos, Russia), Oleg Kononenko (Roscosmos, Russia), Serena Auñón-Chancellor (NASA, USA), Anne McClain (NASA, USA), Alexander Gerst (ESA, Germany) and David Saint-Jacques (CSA, Canada), began their joint work onboard the station.

Their Soyuz MS-11 spacecraft launched from Baikonur at 5:31 p.m. (1131 GMT; 6:31 a.m. EST) then entered a designated orbit just under nine minutes later. Automatic docking was carried out at 20:33 Moscow time after the spacecraft approached the station using a four-loop program.

There are now six people calling the International Space Station home, with the arrival of three fresh faces on Tuesday.

. After the crew checked for leaks, the hatch was opened and they were welcomed aboard the ISS, their home for the next six months.

This is the first launch of a manned spacecraft after the abortive blastoff of the Soyuz carrier rocket on October 11.

Russia launches first manned voyage to ISS since rocket accident

They escaped unharmed but the failed launch was the first such incident in Russia's post-Soviet history and a new setback for the country's once proud space industry.

The launch was closely scrutinised because of the abortive mission to the ISS on October 11, which ended two minutes after take-off when a rocket failure forced its two-man crew to perform an emergency landing.

Roscosmos also argued that sanctions and weak currency have caused the space agency's financial decline.

NASA spokesperson Gary Johnson described the mission as "textbook launch and insertion into orbit" during the liftoff commentary. This is the first time that McClain and Saint-Jacques have been to the ISS, but the fourth mission for Kononenko.

Taking to micro-blogging website Twitter, NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine confirmed that the crew were "safely in orbit" and thanked the United States and Russian teams "for their dedication to making this launch a success". The Soviet-era Soyuz rocket is the only means of transporting astronauts to the ISS since NASA retired the space shuttle in 2011.

A Russian investigation attributed the failure to a sensor that was damaged during the rocket's final assembly.