Wednesday, 19 December, 2018

Hawaiian monk seal has eel removed from its nose

A juvenile Hawaiian monk seal was found with a spotted eel in its nose at French Frigate Shoals in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands Hawaiian Monk Seal Gets Eel Stuck Up Its Nose
Theresa Hayes | 07 December, 2018, 19:57

The Hawaiian monk seal has become endangered due to a range of threats, from fishing net entanglements to disease.

A monk seal spotted with eel stuck up its nose in Hawaii.

A photo shared by the Hawaiian Monk Seal Research Program has revealed the hilariously unfortunate predicament of a juvenile seal with a spotted eel lodged in its nostril.

According to the team with the Hawaiian Monk Seal Research Program, the unusual phenomenon has been seen a handful of times in the past - each with the same outcome.

The agency has two theories on why it happened in this case: A cornered eel was trying to defend itself or escape, and wound up in the seal's nose.

Monk seal researcher Charles Littnan, division director of the protected species division, said this is the third or fourth case scientists have observed of a seal with an eel in its nose.

The administration said it has seen the same "eels in noses" phenomenon almost a handful of times in the last few years.

Hawaiian Monk Seal Gets Eel Stuck Up Its Nose

'We don't know if this is just some unusual statistical anomaly or something we will see more of in the future, ' the NOAA post notes.

According to the final post in this saga, researchers were able to trap the seal and extract a 60cm-long goddamn eel from its nose, noting that it "was surprising as only about 10cm were hanging out" of its nose before extraction.

"Hawaiian monk seals forage by shoving their mouth and nose into the crevasses of coral reefs, under rocks, or into the sand".

They've told the media they really have no idea what's causing the spike in eel-related incidents. The seals were all fine, but the eels did not make it, according to the scientists' post. "We might not ever know".

'Alternatively, the seal could have swallowed the eel and regurgitated it so that the eel came out the wrong way.

NOAA reports all of the eel-huffing seals have shown no ill effects from their fish-sniffing experiments.

Officials estimate only about 1,400 Hawaiian monk seals remain in the wild, most of which are found near the northwestern Hawaiian Islands. It was nearly like those magic trick scarves that keep pulling out of the hat'.