Wednesday, 19 December, 2018

Victory: Macron Permanently Cancels Planned Fuel Tax Hike After Yellow Vest Protests

Paris riots continue despite fuel tax delay 'We Are In a State of Insurrection': Deep Inequality and Macron's Dedication to Elites Fuel Yellow Vest Uprising in France
Nellie Chapman | 06 December, 2018, 00:31

It is a major climbdown by the government of President Macron, who had said the measures were necessary to combat climate change and meet budget deficit reduction targets.

He added that "no tax should endanger national unity" and the "violence must stop".

The concessions made by France's prime minister in a bid to stop the huge and violent anti-government demonstrations that have been rocking France over the past three weeks, seem to have so far failed to convince protesters, with trade unions and farmers now threatening to join the fray. Pressure has been mounting after the grassroots "yellow vest" movement degenerated into fiery street clashes and vandalism in Paris over the weekend, leading to scores of injuries and arrests.

The protests and u-turn of the tax have shown Mr Macron has struggled to achieve most of what he promised, according to Politico.

Rescinding the fuel tax hike was the main demand of the demonstrators, alongside a higher minimum wage and the return of a wealth tax on high-earners which was abolished a year ago.

The protesters, known as the "gilets jaunes", take their name from the high-visibility yellow vests that drivers are required to keep in their vehicles for safety reasons.

"The French people want a complete political transformation".

"The Paris Agreement is fatally flawed because it raises the price of energy for responsible countries while whitewashing some of the worst polluters", said Trump, referring to a global deal on the environment drafted in Paris in late 2015.

"Trump also retweeted a false claim from American conservative student activist Charlie Kirk that said: "'We want Trump' being chanted through the streets of Paris".

When he was elected previous year, his economic reform was meant to improve the lives of French people through lower unemployment and a kick-started economy.

Protests last Saturday caused heavy property damage in Paris and other French cities.

Is Macron now weaker than EVER before after protests and rebellion in France? .

The president - who enjoyed a landslide election victory a year ago - now has an approval rating below 30%.

The Yellow Vest protesters are also irked by the squeeze on the high cost of living.

Over the past three weeks, Macron has come under enormous pressure in the face of nationwide protests against a fuel-tax increase that was set to begin in January.

The rising cost of gasoline and diesel fuel sparked protests that have since evolved into broader demonstrations against Macron's government, exposing tensions between the metropolitan elite and rural poor.

Immediately after coming to power in 2017, Macron pushed through tax cuts for entrepreneurs and high-earners - an "original sin" for his critics.

Whether or not the cancellation of the fuel tax will end the protests is unclear as members of the movement have already called for a "fourth act" to take place on Saturday.