Sunday, 16 December, 2018

Amazon reportedly picks New York, northern Virginia for HQ2

One of the areas that Amazon is considering for a headquarters is Long Island City One of the areas that Amazon is considering for a headquarters is Long Island City
Nellie Chapman | 13 November, 2018, 14:28

Amazon's plan to split its second headquarters, dubbed "HQ2", evenly between two cities will boost its presence around NY and the USA capital as it seeks to gain a recruiting edge over Silicon Valley tech firms.

The company was planning to split its second headquarters, dubbed "HQ2", evenly between two cities, and among the finalists that Amazon was holding advanced talks with were Dallas, Long Island City in NY and Arlington near Washington, D.C., Reuters reported last week, citing sources.

The imminent announcement is expected as soon as Tuesday, according to the people.

For the winners, though, Amazon validated that NY and Washington, D.C. have the environment needed by fast-growing, technology-driven companies.

Los Angeles was the only West Coast city that made the final 20 and many speculated that Amazon would prefer an East Coast locale as the rest of the finalist cities showed, from Atlanta, and Austin to Miami, Philadelphia and Raleigh.

Amazon has reportedly ended its search for the locations of its new headquarters.

Among the finalists that Amazon was holding advanced talks with were Dallas, Long Island City in NY and Arlington near Washington, DC, Reuters has reported, citing sources.

Since Amazon pared the list to 20 cities in January, speculation has been rampant, with lists handicapping supposed front-runners. He was hopeful that HQ2 would come to New York City.

The decision process has been going on since at least the end of 2017 when Amazon essentially launched a contest that sparked competition among cities across the world, including in Seattle and other areas across Washington state. And forgoing too many future taxes that could come from a project as massive as Amazon HQ2 could strain local budgets for public services like roads and schools - or cause taxes to go up for local residents.

If chosen, the neighborhood stands to burnish New York City's reputation as a tech capital.

The headquarter split will give Amazon more diversity for recruiting and could also help lessen congestion and cost of living increases that would have accompanied one bigger office.

Cities across the US have spent months jockeying for a $5 billion investment. Landing Amazon would also cement Long Island City's transformation from a faded manufacturing zone to a vibrant, of-the-moment enclave of waterfront skyscrapers, modernized warehouses and artsy-tech ambience across the East River from midtown Manhattan.

However, the split could also mean economic benefits for the hosts will be muted relative to expectations, especially given the selected cities' size versus some of the other contenders.

The choice of its new office sites follows Amazon's September announcement that it would raise its minimum wage for warehouse workers to $15 (U.S.) an hour.