Thursday, 22 November, 2018

Women in Congress breaks record with 2018 midterm elections

Ayanna Pressley Modal Trigger Ayanna Pressley AP
Melinda Barton | 07 November, 2018, 20:16

Amid a wave of female candidates running for office, Tlaib scored a victory in Michigan's 13th Congressional District, setting her up to be the first Muslim-American woman in Congress. Stacey Abrams, one of 16 women running for governor this year, remains in a tight contest in Georgia.

A record number of women from diverse backgrounds have made history in the United States midterm election by being voted into the House of Representatives.

More women ran in congressional primaries this year than ever before, mostly as Democrats. "Never forget the hard work it took to get us here". With the win, Rojas said, the progressive movement challenging the establishment of the Democratic Party has shown it "can unseat Democrats who are ideologically and demographically out-of-touch with their voters and forced Democratic elected across the country to stiffen their spines".

The surge of female candidates this year has drawn comparisons to the "Year of the Woman", when in 1992 voters sent 47 women to the House, and four women joined the Senate bringing women's numbers to six.

Ayanna Pressley will become the first black member of the House from MA. Most were considered longshots.

Pressley, a Democrat and Boston city councilwoman, will represent Massachusetts' 7th Congressional District in the next Congress. Pressley stunned the political establishment in September, defeating a 10-term incumbent in the Democratic primary, and ran unopposed in the general. "We ran to make change".

"I didn't run because my election would be historic".

Her win beats the previous record held by Republican congresswoman Elise Stefanik, a former White House aide to president George W. Bush who was first elected to an upstate NY constituency in 2014 aged 30.

Michigan Democrat Rashida Tlaib and Ilhan Omar of the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party will become the first Muslim women in Congress.

Sharice Davids and Deb Haaland picked up Congressional seats for Democrats in Kansas and New Mexico Tuesday night, making them the first Native American women elected to Congress in history.

Democrat Mike Espy, who will face Mississippi Republican Rep. Cindy Hyde-Smith in a December runoff, could become the state's first black senator since Reconstruction. Wallace also suggested Ingraham was being hypocritical, saying that if she gives Republicans credit for keeping the Senate, she must also give the Democrats credit for flipping the House.

Tennessee gained the state's first woman in the Senate as Marsha Blackburn defeated former Gov. Phil Bredesen.

Georgia candidate Stacey Abrams, a Democrat, was in a fierce battle to become America's first black woman governor, while Democrat Andrew Gillum narrowly lost his bid to become the first black governor of Florida.

In the first major race called Tuesday night, Lou Leon Guerrero was elected as Guam's governor, becoming the first woman to do so. Polis was also the first openly gay man elected to Congress in 2008.