Saturday, 15 December, 2018

UMN preps for flu season

Flu Can Be A Killer But Some Refuse To Take A Shot UMN preps for flu season
Melissa Porter | 10 October, 2018, 13:56

"We see a lot of flu around this time of year", said Kenitz. The vaccination rate for children in the state was 62 percent, slightly better than the previous two years and better than the national rate of just under 58 percent. "So it makes sense, if you have the inspiration, ability and desire to be vaccinated against influenza", - said the doctors. Making sure that vaccinations would be available for students over the course of several days in a central location on Grounds, while accepting more insurance policies would surely encourage students to get vaccinated. The more people who get vaccinated, the more people will be protected from flu, including older people, young children, pregnant women and people with certain long-term health problems who are more vulnerable to serious flu illness. Older adults are also more likely to suffer complications from flu.

Flu is unpleasant whoever you are. Even if you've had the vaccination before it's important to get it again because the type of virus in circulation changes every year and so the vaccine changes too. Protect yourself and those you love this season by getting by getting your flu shot soon.

Flu is a highly infectious disease and can lead to serious complications if you have an underlying health condition such as COPD, bronchitis, emphysema, diabetes, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease or a chronic neurological disease like multiple sclerosis or cerebral palsy.

One company offers a nasal spray version of flu vaccine, but health experts recently have been debating whether it's as good as shots.

Like sleep deprivation, smoking cigarettes can wreak havoc on your immune system, which puts you at greater risk for infection. The flu vaccine will help protect your child from flu and also reduce the chance of it spreading on to others. CDC recommends that people get a flu vaccine by the end of October. "This is because the body is investing more energy in to keeping them well and alive and has less ability to fight disease", Dr.

Konopacka said the vaccine takes a couple of weeks to build up resistance in your body, so they recommend adults get it before November and the holiday season.

Amongst the "anti-vaxxer" movement, the reasons for choosing to not get vaccinated range from religious and philosophical to citing a long-disproven report that links vaccines to autism. These habits include getting enough sleep, washing hands regularly and avoiding hand contact with the eyes, nose and mouth.

Those most at risk are all entitled to free immunisation.