Tuesday, 23 October, 2018

Here's How to Watch the Perseid Meteor Shower This Weekend

Here's How to Watch the Perseid Meteor Shower This Weekend Here's How to Watch the Perseid Meteor Shower This Weekend
Theresa Hayes | 10 August, 2018, 15:25

The meteor shower's peak is expected to occur the night of Sunday, Aug. 12 into the wee hours of Monday morning.

The annual show is the result of Earth's proximity to the "gritty" debris of Comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle, Boyle said in a release.

According to Space, this August during the peak, there should be about 60 to 70 meteors per hour, although past year saw about 80 an hour.

But what if you're unable to get to that dark site, or - worse yet - what if your weather is poor? But the most spectacular long-lasting meteors, known as "Earthgrazers", can be seen when the radiant is still low above the horizon. Video will be provided by David Brewer in Denver, Colorado.

Once darkness falls on August 12, sky-watchers can expect to see one of the shooting stars every few minutes.

The Perseids are probably the most well-known and widely observed meteor shower globally. "What happens over time is you get the comet and also this huge debris field which exists spread out along the entire orbit", Twarog said. Astronomy Magazine recommends getting up early to try viewing the shower in the last dark hour before dawn, but it's worth looking up at any hour after dusk. That should only increase as the shower reaches its peak.

The Perseids are perhaps the most beloved of all meteor showers due to their predictability. The best time to view this event is after midnight and before sunrise both Saturday and Sunday nights. "Remember, you don't have to look directly at the constellation to see them". As of this writing it appears as though there may be some clouds and perhaps even some rain showers over parts of southeast MA on Saturday and early Sunday. "You can look anywhere you want to-even directly overhead", explained Jones.

This means we'll be left with a dark sky for the rest of the night, and only city light pollution will interfere with the show.

It's the biggest meteor shower of the year, so you better stay up late and grab your binoculars.

-The meteor shower is more visible from the Northern Hemisphere and some mid-southern latitudes, so people in the United States will have a prime view.