Monday, 20 August, 2018

Lombok hit by 5.9 magnitude tremor days after deadly natural disaster

Lombok has been hit by another earthquake GETTY DS LOMBOK EARTHQUAKE The Indonesian island has again been hit by tremors
Melinda Barton | 09 August, 2018, 10:26

Officials said about three-quarters of Lombok's rural north had been without electricity since Sunday, although power had since been restored in most areas.

The death toll from a devastating quake on the Indonesian island of Lombok has risen above 160, an official said on Thursday, as authorities urgently appealed for medicine, food and clean water for some 156,000 people displaced by the disaster. Panicked residents fled into the streets, witnesses said.

Meanwhile the death toll from the powerful quake continues to rise, with 347 people now reported dead, according to CNN.

The latest quake was felt strongly on the island and followed a 6.9 quake on Sunday that killed at least 164 people and damaged thousands of houses.

But the spokesman for Indonesia's national disaster agency, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, said some areas in the north had still not received any aid.

'The corpses are starting to smell and we believe some people buried are still alive - that's why it's a critical time, ' Nugroho said.

Tens of thousands of homes, businesses and mosques were levelled by the quake, which struck on Sunday. Water, food and medical supplies were being distributed from trucks.

"We have no clean water, so if we want to go to the toilet we use a small river nearby", he said, adding they needed food, bedding and medicine.

The governor of the province that includes Lombok where the quake was centered, the military, the national search and rescue agency and regent of North Lombok issued different death tolls that ranged from 226 to 381.

With hospitals and clinics also affected, numerous injured have had to be treated in the open air or in makeshift clinics.

Authorities are still searching through the rubble left behind on Lombok Island, still hoping to find survivors.

A green and yellow dome rested on the pile of rubble, the only part of the structure still intact. In December 2004, a massive magnitude 9.1 natural disaster off Sumatra triggered a tsunami that killed 230,000 people in a dozen countries.