Monday, 19 November, 2018

Scotland Secretary says Trump's visit to country will help 'strengthen vital links'

Donald Trump was less than impressed
Credit
Geoff Pugh  Telegraph Donald Trump was less than impressed Credit Geoff Pugh Telegraph
Kristopher Love | 12 July, 2018, 19:28

The US President touched down in London Stansted Airport, Essex, at 1.50pm BST with his wife, First Lady Melania Trump, after arriving from the North Atlantic Treaty Organisation summit in Brussels.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan, who signed off on the so-called "baby Trump" blimp, defended the decision Thursday, arguing the protests were not anti-American but emblematic of free speech.

The city appears to not be the president's biggest fan - plans for a formal state visit were put on hold previous year after hundreds of thousands of people threatened to protest.

The two leaders will hold talks the following day at Chequers, the 16th-century manor house which is the prime minister's official country residence. Protesters have been inflating a blimp made to look like a baby version of Trump, and are preparing to fly it over Parliament during his visit.

"I would love to say that I think this is going to be a hugely successful visit but I think it's going to be very hard", he said at a pro-Trump gathering in parliament.

A high metal fence has been erected around the US ambassador's central London residence where Trump will spend Thursday night and the embassy has sent out an alert warning Americans in London to keep a low profile in case protests turn violent.

U.S. President Donald Trump checks time prior to a dinner at the Art and History Museum at the Parc du Cinquantenaire during the NATO Summit in Brussels, Belgium July 11, 2018.

Later that afternoon, he will have tea with the Queen at Windsor Castle, before the pair travel to Scotland, where they are expected to stay at his Turnberry golf resort.

He went on to say: "There might be protests, but I believe that the people in the UK, Scotland, Ireland, I think those people, they like me a lot".

"There is definitely a sense that Britain needs America more because of Brexit", said Bronwen Maddox, head of the Institute for Government, a think tank.

"You see, what's going on throughout the world with immigration..."

Mr Smyth said he hoped the protests, and specifically the Trump baby blimp, do not upset the American public.

Prime Minister May has abundant reasons to seek a close relationship with Mr. Trump - not least, the United States will be an even more vital trade partner once Britain leaves the European Union next year - but it is an uneasy embrace, given her opposition to many of his key policies.

Will Trump endorse Theresa May's leadership?

Later, Trump will take tea with Queen Elizabeth II at Windsor Castle, a home to the royals for 1,000 years, part of a tour created to keep him away from protesters.