Wednesday, 26 September, 2018

Former Walmart in Texas Housing 1,469 Migrant Children

Protests have been held around the United States against the Trump administration policy of separating migrant families Protests have been held around the United States against the Trump administration policy of separating migrant families
Melinda Barton | 16 June, 2018, 11:22

Employees at Casa Padre, a former Walmart that houses almost 1,500 unaccompanied migrant children in Brownsville, Texas, called the police on Sen.

State and federal lawmakers from the El Paso area decried that proposal earlier this week, particularly raising concerns about housing children on military bases.

"Effectively, these kids are incarcerated", MSNBC correspondent Jacob Soboroff said Wednesday in an interview on "All In With Chris Hayes". He shared images of the mural, which includes the quotation, "Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war". It was last used in 2016 to house migrant children and families in large, dormitory-style canvas tents.

"They are not in cells they're free to walk around, but they're allowed outside for two hours a day and they're in an old Walmart for 22 hours a day".

Boys share bedrooms with no doors and walls that reach only halfway to the 20-foot-high ceilings, The Post reported.

The Trump administration has selected Tornillo Land Point of Entry, a crossing point along the Texas-Mexico border near El Paso, as the site of its first temporary shelter for immigrant children separated from their parents under the administration's "zero tolerance" policy, a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services spokesperson confirmed Thursday.

One DHS official said the past practice of releasing parents who illegally crossed the border pending a court hearing only created incentives to break the law. But still, there are aspects like the few windows being covered with black mesh, according to the Times, and the fact that children can make two calls a week-perhaps to their separately detained parents-that remind visitors that the occupants are not there voluntarily.

That policy includes separating families, including infants, who cross into the US illegally, and sending those "unaccompanied minors" into the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement.

After white vans accommodated to shuttle as many as half a dozen kids drop them off at the shelter, Casa Padre's new residents are showered, clothed and fed.