Friday, 16 November, 2018

Rebel Wilson's $4.5m defamation damages slashed to $600,000

Bauer Media appealed against a Supreme Court of Victoria order that Wilson be compensated $650,000 in general damages and $3,917,472 in special damages Bauer Media appealed against a Supreme Court of Victoria order that Wilson be compensated $650,000 in general damages and $3,917,472 in special damages
Stacy Diaz | 14 June, 2018, 13:50

In June a year ago a six-person jury found in favour of Wilson's claim against the publisher of Woman's Day and the Australian Women's Weekly.

The articles alleged Wilson had lied about her age, her name and her upbringing in Australia, and were featured across Australian magazines, including Bauer's Australian Women's Weekly, New Weekly and OK Magazine.

In the hours before the appeal, Wilson pointed out that Thursday's case was contending the amount of money she was to be paid, not the result of the case.

On Thursday, however, the Victorian Court of Appeal reduced the sum to A$600,000, saying that Wilson had failed to prove that Bauer was responsible for her missing out on the roles.

According to Buzzfeed, the judge denied Wilson "special damages" stating she had not proven that the defamation cost her work.

The trial verdict found that Wilson, best known for her roles in the "Pitch Perfect" movies and "Bridesmaids", should be compensated for the film roles she testified that she lost following the article's publication, including "Trolls" and "Kung Fu Panda 3".

Wilson was originally awarded $3.9m (£2.3m) for loss of earnings and $650,000 (£382,000) in damages.

But regardless of how much in damages she's awarded, Wilson said she still considers herself a victor.

She added: "The reason I'm here is not for damages".

"I'm away on location in Europe filming right now", she tweeted. And that while it's not about the money, she'd like to cop as much as possible so she can donate it all to charity and the Aussie film industry.

"It followed that the judge's award of damages for economic loss had to be set aside... there was no basis in the evidence for making any award of damages for economic loss".

Speaking on behalf of Bauer Media, General Counsel, Adrian Goss, said in a statement: "It was important for us to revisit the award of damages".

Wilson speaks to the media outside court after her initial victory.