Wednesday, 15 August, 2018

Brexit: MPs says PM must honour 'assurances' over Parliament's role

Brexit: MPs says PM must honour 'assurances' over Parliament's role Brexit: MPs says PM must honour 'assurances' over Parliament's role
Melinda Barton | 13 June, 2018, 16:40

"It is, however, irresponsible to proceed as we are".

There's no time to get the wording of the compromise text wrong because it will probably be debated and voted on in the House of Lords on Monday, according to one senior government official.

He also called for the Government's final proposals to be put to the public in a second referendum.

"I am very pleased that the government has listened to the concerns of many colleagues and has responded positively to the need to amend the bill further to provide a proper mechanism to enable Parliament to act, where necessary, if there is no deal or a deal is rejected by negotiations", Grieve said.

Facing the prospect of losing a vote on a crucial amendment to the government's flagship Brexit legislation - which was created to empower parliament to vote down the final deal without risking a "no-deal" exit from the bloc - ministers intervened with a concession at the 11th hour even as MPs were wrapping up debate on the controversial measure.

The Bracknell MP, who called for a second referendum on whatever deal Mrs May secures from the European Union, later told the Commons there was growing evidence that the Government's Brexit policy is "detrimental to the people we were elected to serve".

Ministers defeated a move to give MPs the decisive say on what happens over Brexit if they do not agree with the final deal negotiated by the United Kingdom government.

The right-wing press is presenting the upcoming votes as a make-or-break moment, continuing its longstanding tactic of describing the Brexit process as the "will of the people" and any attempts to seek greater democratic oversight of the process as "undemocratic".

While promising "further discussions", he said he was concerned that empowering Parliament to "instruct" ministers what to do in the event of no deal would leave the United Kingdom in "very rocky constitutional territory".

"We must under all circumstances respect the result of the referendum", Brexit Secretary David Davis told lawmakers as he opened the debate.

"We have not, and will not, agree to the House of Commons binding the government's hands in the negotiations".

Parliamentary debates about complex legal amendments rarely rouse much heat, but passions run high over anything to do with Brexit.

The Daily Express, another pro-Brexit tabloid, issued a thinly-veiled threat to lawmakers, saying they should "Ignore the will of the people at [their] peril".

Phillip Lee, who resigned this morning, gave an impassioned speech from the "naughty corner" on the backbenches - flanked by Remainers including Bob Neill, Nicky Morgan, receiving congratulations for his decision by Soubry and Sarah Wollaston.

In a tense atmosphere where it was not clear which way the vote would go, the government secured its victory only after offering concessions to one of the leaders of a group of Conservative lawmakers who were threatening to vote against May.

Britain is due to leave the European Union on March 29, 2019, and the bloc is frustrated with what it sees as a lack of firm proposals from the U.K about future relations. May's preferred approach is temporarily keeping the U.K.in some form of temporary customs union with the E.U., but this is unacceptable to hardline Brexiteers in her party.

The Labour Party's Chuka Umunna, who backed staying in the European Union, welcomed the concession as the end of the government threatening to allow Britain to crash out of the European Union without a deal.