Thursday, 13 December, 2018

National Weather Service confirms tornado in Texas County from Friday night's storms

Using a chair as a rain coat at the French Quarter Festival in New Orleans on Friday National Weather Service confirms tornado in Texas County from Friday night's storms
Kristopher Love | 17 April, 2018, 01:23

The epic weather event that began Friday night had slowed somewhat on Sunday after what the weather service described as a "historic" snowstorm Saturday, but the snow kept coming down.

Separately the city of Greensboro tweeted that damage was "prominent" but that a tornado had not been immediately confirmed by the National Weather Service. I spoke to them earlier today and they said due to the large scale of the damage and path of the storms it may take them until late in the day to have a full report.

The estimated time of the storm was 3:45 AM at Lamar University, and 4:05 AM in Orange.

One person died in Sunday's storm, and thousands were left without power because of fallen trees and downed power lines and utility poles.

Urban areas of San Diego, which are not included in the high wind watch's boundaries, were expected to see wind speeds no higher than about 25 miles per hour, forecasters said.

About 33,000 Consumers Energy customers and 125,000 DTE customers were without power by noon Sunday in MI due to damaged power lines. A few inches of snow are possible north of Highway 20, along with a light glaze of ice. Last season the area got 31.9 inches of snow.

On the bright side, the Minneapolis-St.

National Weather Service meteorologist Keith White in Marquette says moderate to heavy snow was falling Sunday morning in the Upper Peninsula.

Between 12:01 a.m. Friday and 10 a.m. Sunday, the Minnesota State Patrol reported 405 crashes, 51 of those involving injuries.

In lower MI, freezing rain that began falling overnight had left roads treacherous and cut power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses by midday Sunday.