Monday, 10 December, 2018

London City Airport Reopens Following Removal of WWII Bomb

The station was evacuated and bomb squad officers carried out a controlled explosion to make the item safe The station was evacuated and bomb squad officers carried out a controlled explosion to make the item safe
Nellie Chapman | 16 February, 2018, 02:42

Residents who were evacuated following the discovery of an unexploded Second World War bomb near London City Airport can return to their homes, police said.

Services were grounded all day Monday after the device was found submerged in the River Thames early Sunday during planned development work at the airport.

London City Airport chief executive Robert Sinclair said all flights to and from the airport had been cancelled.

Light railway stops near the airport have also been shut down due to the exclusion zone.

The 1.5m tapered-end shell was moved to a secure location by Royal Navy divers overnight and is now due to be destroyed in a controlled explosion.

The Metropolitan Police said in a statement: "While we endeavour to progress the operation as quickly as possible and minimise disruption, it is important that all of the necessary steps and precautions are taken to ensure it is dealt with safely".

Airlines using London City Airport include British Airways, Flybe, CityJet, KLM and Lufthansa.

'We will then attach high-grade military explosives before carrying out a controlled explosion.

The Newham Council local authority established a rest centre and asked residents to stay with family or friends if possible.

A total of 261 arrivals and departures had been scheduled for Monday.

"It's been put in 10m of water so we are expecting quite a large plume when we explode it".

But the airport is this morning back up and running, with flights running as usual as experts work on the safe removal of a World War Two ordnance from the dock.

Between September 1940 and May 1941, the Germans dropped about 24,000 tonnes of explosives on London, but 10 percent of them did not detonate, according to historians.