Thursday, 18 October, 2018

Peacock denied as emotional support animal for flight

Feathered friend This is Dexter the peacock whose owner a Brooklyn artist had attempted to take him on board a United Airlines flight as an emotional support animal but was denied Peacock denied as emotional support animal for flight
Nellie Chapman | 31 January, 2018, 04:59

The passenger was trying to bring a large peacock in all its glory onto a flight at Newark Liberty International Airport and had even bought a second seat to accommodate the bird's massive, colorful plumage, according to the airline blog Live and Let's Fly earlier this week. When the woman purchased a ticket for her peacock, whose name was it under?

While Ventiko claimed she had a ticket for her emotional support peacock to accompany her on the flight, Dexter's travel plans went array as United Airlines reportedly denied the request.

Photos of the big blue bird were first shared on the Facebook page of The Jet Set TV Show.

"This animal did not meet guidelines for a number of reasons, including its weight and size", spokeswoman Andrea Hiller said in a statement.

"We explained this to the customers on three separate occasions before they arrived at the airport", airline officials said. And in October 2016, Daniel, an emotional support duck, flew from Charlotte to Asheville, N.C., according to the Washington Post.

United announced that they are considering a similar policy, telling Fox News that they are reevaluating their existing policy on emotional support animals.

Hiller says that United Airlines is dedicated to working with passengers who need an emotional support animal to get them through their flight.

Delta made a decision to enact stricter rules after noticing an 84 percent increase since 2016 in incidents involving untrained or poorly trained animals.

The airline said people tried to claim snakes, spiders, possums, turkeys and many other types of critters as emotional support animals.

The new regulations will require passengers to show the airline documentation that proves an animal's health 48 hours before a flight.

Some Twitter users supported the United passenger's attempt to bring the peacock onto her flight, while others were outraged.