Saturday, 20 October, 2018

Has Nasa's Kepler telescope discovered alien life? Stargazers set for big announcement

Has Nasa's Kepler telescope discovered alien life? Stargazers set for big announcement Has Nasa's Kepler telescope discovered alien life? Stargazers set for big announcement
Theresa Hayes | 11 December, 2017, 18:07

According to NASA officials, this startling discovery was made using machine learning supported by Google. It will take place Thursday, December 14 at 1 p.m. EST.

"There is now clear evidence for substantial numbers of three types of exoplanets; gas giants, hot-super-Earths in short period orbits, and ice giants", NASA said about Kepler's mission. The announcement may be related to one of those planets. The telescope has been instrumental in the discovery of 2,500 planets with approximately 2,000 more to be studied.

The team at the Kepler Space Telescope has been searching for extra-terrestrial life since 2009, and now they have found something spell bounding.

"When Kepler launched in March 2009, scientists didn't know how common planets were beyond our solar system". An official announcement on the NASA website said it is gearing up for a teleconference to reveal a major breakthrough made by the Kepler space telescope, which is now hunting the universe for exoplanets.

In its initial mission, Kepler surveyed just one patch of sky in the northern hemisphere, measuring the frequency of planets whose size and temperature might be similar to Earth orbiting stars similar to our sun.

'Are we alone? Maybe Kepler today has told us indirectly, although we need confirmation, that we are probably not alone, ' Kepler scientist Mario Perez said in a news conference.

In 2014, the spacecraft began a new extended mission called K2, which continues the search for planets outside our solar system, known as exoplanets, while introducing new research opportunities to study young stars, supernovae and other cosmic phenomena. Attendees include Paul Hertz, the director of NASA's Astrophysics division in Washington D.C., and Christopher Shallue from Google. Google Brain functions to assist and conduct research on things like teaching machines to be fair and helping robots pick up sand. "Machine learning is an approach to artificial intelligence, and demonstrates new ways of analyzing Kepler data", said NASA in a press release meant to tease the highly anticipated reveals on the conference, as reported by The Inquisitr.

Most online reports and social media predictions claimed the announcement could be about a major exoplanet discovery, which is the primary mission directive of Kepler.