Monday, 11 December, 2017

Singapore Airlines reroutes flights over North Korean missile threat

Altered Dr Langbroek also pointed out that in one of the images the Sirius star is missing from the Canis Major constellation Altered Dr Langbroek also pointed out that in one of the images the Sirius star is missing from the Canis Major constellation
Melinda Barton | 07 December, 2017, 09:29

North Korea tested its new Hwasong-15 (KN-22) intercontinental ballistic missile before dawn last Tuesday, but while the launch came as a surprise for many, the US intelligence saw it coming. Korean Air said the pilots on two of its flights bound for Seoul "saw a flash and everyone is assuming it should be the missile because of the timing". Pyongyang said the projectile flew as high as 4,475 kilometers (2,800 miles) before plummeting down into waters off the western coast of Japan.

European airlines Lufthansa and Air France-KLM shifted their paths in August after two North Korean test launches in July.

The North Korean missile was sacked very high up, reaching an altitude of 4,475 kilometers (2,780 miles) before falling back into the Sea of Japan about 950 kilometers (600 miles) from where it was launched.

US officials told CNN that the re-entry vehicle likely failed during North Korea's most recent missile test, and the crew of a Cathay Pacific flight claims to have seen the missile explode during re-entry, although David Wright, a senior physicist with the Union of Concerned Scientists, suspects that the crew actually saw stage separation and second-stage ignition during the ascent.

The missile was far from the plane, and operation was unaffected, Cathay said, adding that it had informed other carriers and relevant authorities. The airline changed the route back in July after a previous North Korean missile test, according to CNN Money.

The UN's International Civil Aviation Organization states that nations have a "responsibility to issue risk advisories regarding any threats to the safety of civilian aircraft operating in their airspace".

North Korea has conducted most of this year's missiles tests during daylight hours, and background landmarks help analysts locate exactly where a missile was launched.

Earlier it was reported that the DPRK on Wednesday morning, November 29, local time launched a ballistic missile from the vicinity of Pyongyang.