Вторник, 12 Декабря, 2017

Movie Club is another movie theater subscription service that's cheaper than Netflix

Cinemark just launched its first-ever movie theatre membership program called Movie Club Cinemark just launched its first-ever movie theatre membership program called Movie Club
Melinda Barton | 07 Декабря, 2017, 17:19

On Tuesday, Cinemark - which has theaters at Capital Mall in Olympia, in Tacoma and Federal Way - rolled out Movie Club, a subscription discount service.

One downside to Movie Club: Cinemark's chairman, Lee Roy Mitchell, is kind of a huge jerk who for years directed the company to pursue victims of the 2012 mass shooting at an Aurora, Colorado location for $700,000 in legal fees after they sued over poor security at the theater. Members can buy a movie ticket a month for $8.99 and unused tickets roll over at the end of the month.

MoviePass' model, which works around major movie theaters, has proven controversial, and led to skepticism as to whether it (along with its corporate parent Helios & Matheson) can be successful in the long run.

But now an actual movie theater chain is responding with a similar plan. But MovieClub from Cinemark is a sign that theaters are fighting back. "Maybe we can encourage that person to come six or seven times a year". Furthermore, you can share all your Movie Club perks (ticket price and concessions discounts) with an additional guest.

Cinemark's less dramatic savings may make it more sustainable. Users only pay $9.95 a month, but MoviePass pays theaters the full value of each purchased ticket.

Cinemark owns almost 350 theaters in the US, including 15 in Utah. Through its Movie Club, Cinemark is testing out a solution to empty seats that may prove more lasting.

The price level, whatever the case, appears to reflect a response to MoviePass, which recently launched a yearly payment option of $89.95-or $6.95 per month-plus a processing fee. "Anything that helps drive attendance to movies we support", said Zoradi.

Hollywood wrapped up the 2017 summer movie season with its worst number of tickets sold in a quarter century, ushered in by a series of massive box-office flops made worse by ubiquitous critical social media reviews and the growth of competing streaming services like Netflix and HBO Go.