Monday, 11 December, 2017

European Commission to haul Czech, Hungary, Poland before court over refugee sharing

EU sues Czech Republic, Hungary and Poland over low refugee intake Brussels to sue Hungary, Poland and Czech Republic over asylum seekers
Melinda Barton | 07 December, 2017, 21:50

In response to the migration crisis in 2015, the European Union adopted a decision to relocate asylum seekers who arrived in Italy and Greece, which were dealing with a massive inflow of migrants.

The European Commission is to sue Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic at the European Court of Justice (ECJ) for refusing to take in asylum seekers.

Whereas all other Member States have relocated and pledged in the past months, Hungary has not taken any action at all since the relocation scheme started, Poland has not relocated anyone and not pledged since December 2015.

The three countries claim that Brussels is attempting to interfere with their national sovereignty.

The commission launched infringement procedures against the three states in June and warned them last month that further action was likely.

The Commission has also chose to file a lawsuit in the European court of justice against Hungary adopted in this country, the laws on non-governmental organizations and higher education.

The EU's "relocation" scheme is now wrapping up having moved 32,000 out of an originally planned total of 160,000, but it caused bad blood when it was forced through two years ago despite the objections of some countries.

The organization has also made a decision to file a lawsuit in the European court of justice against Hungary adopted in this country, the laws on non-governmental organizations and higher education.

The Commission also said it would take Hungary to the ECJ, the EU's highest court, over its controversial higher education law, which critics say curbs academic freedom. The replies provided by the three Member States were not found satisfactory and the Commission made a decision to move to the next stage of the infringement procedure by sending reasoned opinions on 26 July 2017.

-Monitoring of the European Union law in the area of Home Affairs.

In June, Hungary approved a law aimed at forcing civil society groups receiving more than 24,000 euros ($26,000) annually in overseas funding to register as a "foreign-supported organisation", or face closure.

The European Commission said that the laws on foreign non-governmental organisations "indirectly discriminate and disproportionately restrict donations from overseas to civil society organisations".

The Luxembourg-based ECJ could impose heavy fines.