Sunday, 23 September, 2018

Senators Seek Delay on Net Neutrality Vote

Chairman Ajit Pai of the Federal Communications Commission at microphone giving testimony to lawmakers in June. A group of Senators asked Pai to investigate phony public comments before holding a vote on the rollback of net neutrality regulations in a Senators Seek Delay on Net Neutrality Vote
Nellie Chapman | 04 December, 2017, 23:12

If the net neutrality rules are revoked, Schmitt said he thinks it would hurt democracy.

In a review of FCC comments over the past six months, Schneiderman's office found that at least one million submissions may have impersonated Americans, including as many as 50,000 NY residents - a potential violation of state law. Over the summer, the FCC was flooded with almost 22 million comments when it sought public input on the proposal.

Senators asked chairman Ajit Pai of the Federal Communications Commission to investigate phony public comments before holding a vote on the rollback of net neutrality regulations in a letter on Monday. "You can not conduct a legitimate vote on a rulemaking proceeding if you have a record that is in shambles, as this one is". His office suspects that as many as a million of those comments are linked to stolen identities, including a 13 year old who never submitted a comment, a recently deceased woman and the office of the Attorney General's own assistant press secretary.

Tina Pelkey, a spokesperson for the FCC, responded in a statement Monday: "At today's news conference, they didn't identify a single comment relied upon in the draft order as being questionable". Further, Schneiderman notes that 50,000 consumer complaints are missing from the FCC record.

The Attorney General's Office has set up a website for New Yorkers where you can check to see if your identity was used without your consent. As a result, we are requesting that you delay your planned vote on this item until you can conduct a thorough review of the state of the record and provide Congress with greater assurance of its accuracy and completeness. He said comments submitted in support of net neutrality were likely tied to automated accounts. In addition, according to Hart, 400,000 comments backing the rules appeared to originate from a Russian mailing address.

"It started off with the idea that the Internet providers like Comcast and Verizon could do differential pricing based on the content of the package that was being delivered, the idea being that things like video took a lot more bandwidth than other forms of Internet traffic, " Waldo said, www.thecrimson.com reported.