Sunday, 10 December, 2017

Google's first ever coding Doodle is as cute as it is fun

Google Celebrates 50 Years of Kids Coding Languages With an Interactive Doodle Google's FUN interactive doodle celebrates 50 years of kids coding languages
Theresa Hayes | 04 December, 2017, 18:10

Children were primarily established to writing computer programs or coding 50 years ago, and Google has pronounced this turning point with a synergistic doodle.

Designed in 1967 by Seymour Papert and a team of researchers at MIT, the pioneer of kids coding languages helped kids learn about math by inputting commands that would direct an on-screen or electronic turtle.

Champika Fernando, Director of Communications, Scratch Team said, "My first experience with coding was in a free after-school program back in the eighties when I was nine years old". The Doodle uses Scratch's signature drag and drop jigsaw puzzle coding language, created to be accessible to coders of all ages.

The game is based on the Scratch programming language for kids and see players snap together a variety of blocks to make the rabbit character move around.

Computer Science Education Week (CSEdWeek) is an annual program dedicated to inspiring K-12 students to take interest in computer science. However, at that time, kids programming on computers sounded impractical. It is created to be less intimidating than typical programming languages, but just as powerful and expressive.

Today, computers are used in nearly every aspect of our lives. New it allowed us to give visibility to teaching programming. Those early experiences not only influenced my career path, but provided me with new ways to express my ideas and influence the world around me.

Be it Veterans Day, Saint Patrick's Day, Thanksgiving or Halloween-each Google Doodle, the bespoke images and videos that head the popular search engine throughout the year, comes with a message.

"This week, millions of people around the world can and will have their first experience with coding".

You can also get programming software on your iPad for kids to play with, and Swift Playground offers all the fun of gaming while learning how to code in the process. She adds that she hopes people will find this experience appealing and engaging enough to be encouraged to pursue it further. Go here to check out some of the incredible range of things kids are creating with code.