Sunday, 10 December, 2017

Cheese Every Day Could Keep The Doctor Away

Foods to keep your heart healthy People who eat cheese every day could be less likely to have a heart attack
Melissa Porter | 04 December, 2017, 16:42

The aforementioned portion was 40 grams, roughly the size of a matchbox.

Eating 40 grammes cheese every day may reduce the risk of stroke and heart attacks, a study claims. All cheese is rich in vitamins, minerals and proteins that help against cardiovascular disease. In addition, a number of substances in the cheese to prevent clogged arteries.

A British study carried out earlier in the year also found that nearly one million people saw no increased risk with regular cheese consumption.

In the latest study, experts at Soochow University in Suzhou, China, pooled results from 15 earlier studies on cheese and heart risk.

Those that were eating the above amount - which is only a few crackers worth of cheese - a day had less heart attacks and 10 per cent less strokes.

Commenting on the research, Ian Givens, Professor of Food Chain Nutrition at Reading University, said, that the participants were fed with calcium from dairy products such as cheese and it was observed that it played an important part in reducing extra fat from the body.

However, the researchers couldn't tell what impact long-term cheese consumption can have on health.

Even full-fat cheese, milk and yoghurt do not increase the danger, the review of 29 studies found.

As small cheese cube as a match box, if eaten on daily basis with a constant regular amount, can reduce the heart attacks possibilities by 14 per cent.

Far from having a negative effect, a number of large studies have shown dairy products to have a protective effect on factors relating to heart health.

Cheese is known to contain high levels of calcium, which means that although it is high in fat, less of that fat is absorbed by the body.

New research suggests cheese is good for your heart. Though cheese contains fat, it is of a type which absorbs less in the body.