Tuesday, 12 December, 2017

Senate Candidate Roy Moore Speaks Out During Campaign Appearance

Judge Roy Moore speaks into the microphone at his victory party in Alabama 'Can we get real for a moment?': Watch CNN's Bolduan epic scolding of Trump for ducking his sex scandals
Melinda Barton | 15 November, 2017, 08:23

The National Republican Senatorial Committee cut ties to Moore late last week after The Washington Post first reported on Moore and the women. Now, people from President Trump to Ohio Senator Rob Portman believe that, in light of these allegations, Moore should step aside from his candidacy.

Sessions made the comment under questioning Tuesday by Texas Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee. Does this mean that he stands by his endorsement of the pedophile running for Senate, or simply that he does not have the guts to stand up to a member of his own party?

Alabama Democratic Senate candidate Doug Jones says he's exhausted of people blaming his campaign for reports of sexual misconduct by his Republican opponent, Roy Moore. One woman said she was 14 years old when Moore initiated sexual contact with her. "They've done everything they could, and now they are together to try to keep me from going to Washington", Moore said. And on Monday, a separate Alabama woman alleged Moore sexually assaulted her when she was a teenager, and described her experience at a news conference, represented by attorney Gloria Allred.

Several women have accused Moore of seeking romantic relationships with them while they were teenagers.

Now, the Alabama Republican Party is the only other GOP entity that is participating in Moore's fundraising efforts. Post spokeswoman Molly Gannon Conway called the accusation "categorically false", adding that The Post has "an explicit policy that prohibits paying sources". Some Republicans said they believe Sessions is reluctant to run but expressed hope that Trump - who's soured on him after he appointed a special prosecutor to investigate Trump's 2016 campaign's ties to Russian Federation - might urge him to run.

A close-up of a woman wearing glasses

Roy Moore has denied the allegations, and has showed no indication that he intends to bow out of the race. But by Monday, McConnell was saying flatly that Moore should quit the race.

Under state law, Moore can not be removed from the ballot.

The national Democratic Party, however, has yet to invest directly in the race beyond funds to build the state party, and has not changed that stance since the Moore allegations surfaced. But other evangelicals feel the allegations force them to make an uncomfortable decision. "I do not know enough of the evidence to know with confidence what the true facts are".

Asked whether his campaign was in touch with Moore's alleged victims, Jones said, "I'm exhausted of people blaming this campaign".