Saturday, 25 November, 2017

Rocket Issue Delays Launch of Advanced New JPSS-1 Weather Satellite

Rocket Issue Delays Launch of Advanced New JPSS-1 Weather Satellite Rocket Issue Delays Launch of Advanced New JPSS-1 Weather Satellite
Theresa Hayes | 14 November, 2017, 15:55

JPSS-1's mission is to continue to provide a gap-less recording and monitoring of global ozone concentration levels as part of the U.S.' treaty obligation in the Montreal Protocol.

For years, policy makers and scientists anxious about a looming polar-orbiting satellite gap that could come once one satellite blinked out from old age, prior to the next one launching. Forecasters will be able to use the data to better predict weather events and hazards, such as a hurricane's track, and when a hurricane will intensify or weaken, as well as identifying power outages in addition to locating and evaluating damage following a storm. After it successfully clears the on-orbit test phase, NOAA-20 will become the nation's primary polar weather satellite and Suomi NPP will become its back up. NOAA funds and manages the program, operations and data products. It will be mounted atop the first stage of the rocket, seen on the left, as preparations continue for the launch of the Joint Polar Satellite System-1, or JPSS-1. The Delta II will also be carrying five university CubeSats that will be deployed in Earth orbit before the release of JPSS-1 into its final orbit. "We are proud to contribute to NOAA's continued leadership in critical weather forecasting throughout the entire JPSS series".

The JPSS-1 spacecraft was built by Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colo.

The ATMS is the next generation of cross-track sounders that will provide a wealth of data and global observational information of the Earth's surface and atmosphere using microwaves.

Assuming that JPSS-1 launches successfully on Tuesday and functions normally in orbit, the USA will again have two working polar satellites at work at the same time. Instruments on board were designed by Ball, along with Raytheon, Harris and Northrop Grumman.

A United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket carrying the Joint Polar Satellite System 1 weather satellite stands atop its launchpad at Vandenberg Air Force Base in California after a rocket issue prevented a planned liftoff on November 14, 2017.

Satellites like JPSS-1 are not responsible for the images typically shown on your nightly weather forecast or your phone's weather app, since most weather imagery comes from geostationary satellites, which orbit above a fixed point on the planet.

The event is for credentialed reporters only.