Friday, 24 November, 2017

People Contract Legionnaire's Disease After Visiting Disneyland

People Contract Legionnaire's Disease After Visiting Disneyland People Contract Legionnaire's Disease After Visiting Disneyland
Melissa Porter | 11 November, 2017, 22:35

About a dozen people in the Anaheim, CA area, or visitors to the area in September were diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease, according to Orange County health officials.

After the Orange County Health Care Agency reported an increase of Legionnaires' cases in Anaheim, the park investigated and found two towers had "had elevated levels of Legionella bacteria".

According to a LA Times report, Disney reported on November 3 that routine testing had detected elevated levels of Legionella in two cooling towers a month earlier, and the towers had been disinfected.

There is no known ongoing risk associated with the outbreak, according to Good.

The health agency had tracked 12 cases of the respiratory disease in the Anaheim area, including the nine cases among Disneyland visitors.

Legionnaires' is a airborne disease which causes a form of pneumonia especially unsafe to people 50 years or older.

According to the OCHCA, the Legionnaire's disease exposure period ranged from September 12 to September 27, Hymel said, adding that Disney thoroughly reviewed all regular water testing for the resort, "including work performed by contracted third-party experts", and "implemented additional redundant testing of other cooling towers on our property". The county contacted Disney after it discovered several had gone to the park. The towers will reopen once they are no longer contaminated, park officials said.

On November 3, Disney reported that routine testing had detected elevated levels of Legionella in two cooling towers a month earlier, and they were disinfected, according to the health agency. Outbreaks often happen in hot tubs, cooling towers and large air-conditioning systems that emit water vapor into the air. It is treated with antibiotics and hospital care, but one in 10 of those who contract the disease dies from infection.

Those most at risk of getting sick from Legionella infection include people who are smokers, have chronic lung disease or weak immune systems, and people over the age of 65.