Tuesday, 12 December, 2017

Facebook wants your nudes to combat revenge porn

Sherri Watson | 09 November, 2017, 20:03

If someone has become the victim of revenge porn, Facebook and the Cyber Civil Rights Initiative created a booklet detailing what actions to take, including reporting the image or video, seeking support from a friend or therapist, calling the CCRI Helpline, documenting everything, and blocking the culprit.

So, the solution to preventing complete strangers from seeing your nudes is... to send your nudes to a complete stranger.

Adults who have shared nude or sexually explicit photos with someone online, and who are anxious about unauthorised distribution, can report such images to the Australian government's eSafety Commission. From there, Facebook will use image-matching technology to detect whether or not an uploaded photo has been previously flagged.

The pilot program is also available in the USA, the United Kingdom and Canada, according to CNBC. By having a nude photo, they can use a recognition algorithm to make sure the same image is never uploaded again by anyone else.

Revenge porn isn't uncommon in the United States.

Social media giant Facebook is trialling a new system urging its users to 'send nudes'.

"With its billions of users, Facebook is one place where many offenders aggress because they can maximize the harm by broadcasting the nonconsensual porn to those most close to the victim".

Australia's e-safety commissioner Julia Inman Grant told ABC, 'We see many scenarios where maybe photos or videos were taken consensually at one point, but there was not any sort of consent to send the images or videos more broadly'.

According to Australia's eSafety office, 1 in 5 Australians has faced image-based abuse, where an intimate photo has been posted to social media without their consent.

In April, Facebook detailed plans to fight revenge porn, including an artificial intelligence tool capable of matching photos to prevent them from appearing on platforms like Messenger or Instagram.