Thursday, 21 September, 2017

China to again have one of the world's fastest bullet trains

China to rev up bullet train revolution with world's fastest service on Shanghai-Beijing line World's fastest bullet train to run between Beijing and Shanghai, touching top speed of 350 kmph
Melinda Barton | 22 August, 2017, 22:11

China's new-generation high-speed bullet train - the Fuxing - was put into operation yesterday on two railway lines connecting major cities in the Beijing-Tianjin- Hebei area.

On July 27, the Fuxing trains were tested for safety and reliability at maximum speed.

To mark the return of the higher-speed service, the trains have been named "Fuxing" - Chinese for rejuvenation - in line with a national government slogan and development plan.

About one-third of China's high- speed railways were created to allow trains to run at a speed of 350kmh, according to Mr He Huawu of the China Academy of Engineering.

Railway workers pose next to one of China's new bullet trains.

Railroads are China's main traffic artery to sell its goods overseas, particularly under the country's 'Belt and Road Initiative'.

After cutting back the speed of the Beijing to Shanghai bullet train following a deadly crash, China is set to again make it one of the world's fastest. China Railway has not released financial data for specific lines, but a bond issuance prospectus past year said the corporate entity running the line made a profit of 6.6 billion yuan in 2015, or about US$1 billion.

China's standardised EMU is to go into 350 km/h passenger service between Beijing and Shanghai next month.

Zhao Jian, a professor at Beijing Jiaotong University and a leading researcher on the country's high-speed railway network, told the South China Morning Post that the higher speeds could increase the risk of collisions, so to avoid accidents the railway operator would have to reduce the number of trains on the line.

The Fuxing trains were unveiled in June 2017 and are capable of top speeds of 400kmh. China operates the world's longest railway network, accounting for almost 60 percent of the global total.