Saturday, 16 December, 2017

CNMI governor backs Trump's stance on North Korea

US President Donald Trump US President Donald Trump
Nellie Chapman | 13 August, 2017, 10:10

"Our office will be notified from the military and will utilize all forms of mass communication to get the message out to the public", Gaminde said.

"Local media, village mayors and social media would be used to disseminate information".

"If you hear the sirens, tune into local media - radio, print, television - for further instructions", Gaminde said.

South Koreans are buying more gold and ready to eat meals, while the government plans to expand nation-wide civil defence drills planned for this month as rhetoric between North Korea and the USA ramps up tension.

The latest war of words between Trump and the North -ruled by young leader Kim Jong-Un- unnerved many in the South, even though it has become largely used to hostile rhetoric from its neighbor.

"If it's going to happen it's going to happen", Loiue Joyce, a woman in her mid-20s, said of the North Korean threat, as she enjoyed a day of shopping.

"We always maintain a high state of readiness", Kuntz said.

"The way our infrastructure is built - an 8.3 quake a decade ago, powerful typhoons - they are well-equipped to coordinate both pre-event and also post-event", he said. At the northern end of the island, Andersen Air Force Base houses B-1 bombers as well as the Navy's Helicopter Combat Support Squadron Twenty-five. "North Korea raising tension (on the Peninsula) is a serious challenge against the South Korean-US alliance and the global community".

Guam is a launching point for US strategic bombers that the North, virtually flattened by USA bombs during the 1950-53 Korean War, sees as particularly threatening.

Threatening to fire a volley of missiles toward a major US military hub _ and the home to 160,000 American civilians _ may seem like a pretty bad move for a country that is seriously outgunned and has an terrible lot to lose.

"I don't think there's anything to worry about".

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says he will do everything he can to protect the Japanese people as tensions escalate over North Korean plans to send missiles flying over Japan toward Guam.

"So unless those North Korean missiles were to fall short, the Patriots shouldn't have a function to serve in this particular case", he said. But if the missiles aren't expected to hit the island - the stated goal is to have them hit waters well offshore - should it?

North Korea said on Thursday its army would complete plans in mid-August to fire four intermediate-range missiles over Japan to land near the US Pacific territory of Guam.

After Trump's "fire and fury" threat heightened tension, average daily sales volume has been 250 bars, ranging in weight between 10 grams (0.35 oz) and 100 grams (3.5 oz), versus about 50 earlier, Song said, adding the trend would continue through August.

USA tensions with North Korea and its ambitions to obtain a nuclear weapon have been a concern for the last four presidential administrations, Peterson noted.

"Nobody really deserves to be caught in the middle of these games", said Victoria-Lola Leon Guerrero, an activist who campaigns for a lowered military presence.

"It's gotten progressively worse over the last 20 years", Peterson said.

In an editorial on Saturday, North Korea's Minju Joson newspaper said that the US "finds itself in an ever worsening dilemma, being thrown into the grip of extreme security unrest by the DPRK". Peterson said he reserves judgment, stating that everyone responds differently to a bully.

Asked if people in Guam should be anxious about North Korea's threats, Defense Secretary Jim Mattis told reporters en route to Seattle this week, "No".

The possibility of escalation is made even more acute by the lack of any means of official communication across the Demilitarized Zone, though there has been no easing of the barrage of inflammatory comments in the US and the North since new sanctions against North Korea were announced last week. The U.S. recaptured the territory three years later. North Korea has been increasingly sensitive to the exercises lately because they reportedly include training for "decapitation strikes" to kill Kim Jong Un and his top lieutenants.