Thursday, 19 October, 2017

Brexit deal not 'back door' to staying in EU: Ministers

The website of Country Squire Magazine- with a prominent Land Rover The website of Country Squire Magazine- with a prominent Land Rover
Melinda Barton | 13 August, 2017, 20:08

"We need to get on with negotiating the bigger issues around our future partnership to ensure we get a deal that delivers a strong United Kingdom and EU", Brexit minister David Davis said in a statement.

News of the offer of a "Schengen area" between Britain and Ireland came as the Government prepares to publish a formal proposal to the European Union on the future of the Northern Irish border.

The government says it hopes to persuade the 27 other European Union nations to start negotiating a "deep and special" future relationship that would include a free trade deal between Britain and the EU.

Prime Minister Theresa May then called a snap election in an attempt to increase her Conservative Party's majority in Parliament and strengthen her negotiating hand.

David Davis, the Brexit secretary said the publication of the papers, which will begin this week, would mark "an important next step" towards delivering last year's referendum vote to leave the EU.

They said the UK's borders "must continue to operate smoothly", that goods bought on the internet "must still cross borders", and "businesses must still be able to supply their customers across the EU" in the weeks and months after Brexit.

In the Telegraph, Hammond and Fox said: "We want our economy to remain strong and vibrant through this period of change".

That is why we believe a time-limited interim period will be important to further our national interest and give business greater certainty - but it can not be indefinite; it can not be a back door to staying in the EU.

Brussels has refused to start talks on a post-Brexit relationship with London until the immediate issues of Britain's withdrawal، including its "divorce bill،" have been settled.

They will start with one covering the thorny issues of the border between Northern Ireland and the Republic to be followed in the autumn by a second series looking at the future relationship with the European Union, including post-Brexit customs arrangements.

The Labour ex-cabinet minister described the outcome of the 2016 referendum as an "unparalleled act of economic self-harm".

"We've been crystal clear that issues around our withdrawal and our future partnership are inextricably linked, and the negotiations so far have reinforced that view".

The UK is now due to leave the European Union at the end of March 2019 after almost 52 percent of Britons opted to leave the bloc during the European Union referendum in June previous year.

"The referendum will be no excuse if the country is driven off a cliff", he declared.

Britain's Brexit Secretary David Davis is due to hold a third round of talks with the EU's chief negotiator Michel Barnier in Brussels at the end of August.