Monday, 28 May, 2018

Palestinians Cheer Israel's Removal Of Security Measures At Historic Mosque

Palestinians Cheer Israel's Removal Of Security Measures At Historic Mosque Palestinians Cheer Israel's Removal Of Security Measures At Historic Mosque
Melinda Barton | 27 July, 2017, 17:10

The Jerusalem Mufti and the Wakf announced on Thursday morning that Muslims will return to pray at Temple Mount, according to Channel 2.

Israel installed the detectors at entry points to Al-Aqsa mosque compound in Jerusalem after two police guards were fatally shot on July 14, setting off the bloodiest clashes between Israelis and Palestinians in years.

But it remains to be seen whether Muslim worshippers will accept the security measures that Israel plans to implement in their place. Palestinians were outraged by the move and claimed Israel was trying to expand its control over the site, a charge Israel strongly denies.

The Jordanian government, which cooperated with Israel to end the crisis, also congratulated the Palestinians on the removal of the security measures and stated that is "a necessary step to ease tensions" in the Palestinian territories and the holy Muslim sites.

But after protests and intensive global diplomacy to prevent further unrest, the Israeli government removed the detectors from the site.

He also accused Israel of using excessive force against Palestinians, prompting Tel Aviv to point out Ankara's own conflicts.

The attack prompted the authorities to install metal detectors, security cameras and other measures at the site.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres is urging all political, religious and community Ieaders to refrain from "provocative action and rhetoric" over the holy sites in Jerusalem and is calling on Israel "to demonstrate restraint".

Jews revere the hilltop compound in Jerusalem's Old City as the Temple Mount, site of the two Jewish biblical temples.

An acrimonious session of Jordan's parliament was cut short after lawmakers walked out in protest over the government's handling of a deadly shooting at the Israeli Embassy in the kingdom.

Israeli authorities said the metal detectors were needed because the July 14 attackers smuggled guns into the site and emerged from it to attack the officers.

The detectors, installed following a shooting attack that killed three Israeli policemen, sparked a huge protest.

Some said they were drawn by the experience of shared objective, rare in east Jerusalem's fractured society, where Israel has clamped down on Palestinian efforts to organize politically.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu didn't fare much better. Others criticized him for making hasty decisions at the Holy Land's most sensitive site.

But after protests and intensive global diplomacy to prevent further unrest, the government removed the detectors from the site.

This came after Israel removed metal detectors earlier on Tuesday from the walled compound that is holy to Muslims and Jews.