Monday, 17 December, 2018

Russian Federation recalls Sergey Kislyak to Moscow

HANDOUT EDITORIAL USE ONLY  NO SALES Kislyak with Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov and President Trump in the White House in May
Melinda Barton | 27 June, 2017, 08:00

Russian Federation has reportedly recalled its ambassador to the United States, Sergey Kislyak, as the Federal Bureau of Investigation probe into election interference continues.

The Washington Post reported on May 26 that Trump's senior adviser and son-in-law, Jared Kushner proposed to Kislyak in December that a secure communications back-channel between Trump's presidential transition team and the Kremlin be established.

'He could use some time away, ' a USA -based diplomat told BuzzFeed.

National Security Adviser Michael Flynn was sacked on February 13 - 24 days after Trump took office - for failing to disclose the nature of a meeting with Kislyak before Trump's inauguration.

Kislyak's replacement as ambassador, Anatoly Antonov, was approved last month by the foreign affairs committee of the lower house of the Russian parliament, according to state media. During that meeting, Trump shared classified intelligence information with the Russians and called fired FBI Director James Comey, a "nut job".

Sergey Kislyak, 66, will depart his position as Russian ambassador to the U.S.at the end of the summer as part of a long-planned rotation, two other USA officials told NBC News. In Senate confirmation hearings to become attorney general, he failed to disclosed those meetings.

After that meeting and others came to light, Flynn stepped down from his post as national security adviser, and Sessions recused himself from involvement in the FBI's investigation into Russian election interference.

The Russian foreign ministry has denied reports that its ambassador to the US, Sergey Kislyak, is being recalled, even as plans for his departure are under way in Washington.

Kislyak trained as an engineer in Moscow before joining the Foreign Ministry in 1977, at the height of the Cold War.

Kislyak was taken aback by the request and notified his superiors in Moscow. However, the US-Russia Business Council has announced that it will hold a going away party for Kislyak on July 11.