Понедельник, 11 Декабря, 2017

China's Li: fighting climate change is 'global consensus'

China's Li: fighting climate change is 'global consensus' China's Li: fighting climate change is 'global consensus'
Melinda Barton | 04 Июня, 2017, 03:48

A White House official said Wednesday that there could be "caveats in the language" announcing a withdrawal, leaving open the possibility that his decision isn't final. President Trump's decision today highlights one of the fundamental differences between Republicans and Democrats and it is a sad statement that Republicans continue to refute science and the will of the worldwide community on an issue of global importance. The president has been known to change his thinking on major decisions and tends to seek counsel from both inside and outside advisers, many with differing agendas, until the last minute.

Pence called Trump's decision "refreshing". "We certainly will be at the table", she said, "playing a leadership role because we think it's the right thing to do and it makes economic sense". Without mentioning the US specifically, Li said that "China in recent years has stayed true to its commitment" and pointed out that his was one of the first countries to ratify the 2015 Paris Agreement.

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang says fighting climate change is a "global consensus" and an "international responsibility".

Trump faced considerable pressure to hold to the deal during visits with European leaders and Pope Francis on his recent trip overseas.

Business leaders, normally strong supporters of Republican initiatives, had vigorously appealed to Trump not to abandon the agreement.

Hundreds of high-profile businesses have spoken out in favor of the deal, including Apple, Google and Walmart.

The uncertain future of US involvement in the accord pushed even big oil companies like Shell and Exxon, as well as tech companies large and small, to make an appeal to the Trump administration not to back out of the agreement.

Trump's predecessor Barack Obama enacted the deal without U.S. Senate ratification.

Congressional Republicans applauded the decision, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky saying Trump had "put families and jobs ahead of left-wing ideology and should be commended". He said that even though "it looks like that attempt failed". the "law is the law". "This notion, 'I am Trump, I am American, America first and I am getting out, ' that is not going to happen".

British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said Britain would continue to press the U.S.to reduce unsafe emissions even if Trump pulls out.

Conservatives, such as Pruitt, have argued that the agreement is not fair to the United States and that staying in it would be used as a legal weapon by environmental groups seeking to fight Trump environmental policies. Chief strategist Steve Bannon supports an exit.

Trump's chief economic adviser, Gary Cohn, has discussed the possibility of changing the USA carbon reduction targets instead of pulling out of the deal completely. Senior adviser Jared Kushner generally thinks the deal is bad but still would like to see if emissions targets can be changed. Several of his top aides also opposed the action, including his daughter, Ivanka Trump. The official, who is involved in preparing the meeting between European Union officials and China's premier, was not authorized to speak publicly and discuss the matter on condition of anonymity because the meeting statement was not finalized.

Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke said Wednesday in Alaska that he had "yet to read what the actual Paris Agreement is", and would have to read it before weighing in.

"Climate change is not a fairy tale".

But there's no clear-cut outcome or penalty for countries that fall short of their pledged goals.

That means the USA could stay in the accord and choose not to hit its goals or stay in the pact but adjust its targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Instead of cutting emissions to 26 to 28 percent below 2005 levels by 2025 (the nation's original pledge under the Obama administration), an analysis by Rhodium Group estimated that emissions would fall just 15 to 19 percent below 2005 levels.

Ending weeks of speculation, some of it fueled by Trump himself and his Cabinet members, he said, "As of today, the United States will cease all implementation of the nonbinding Paris accord".

It very likely will take place in Canada, around the same time as the United Nations General Assembly opens in New York City on September 12. The organization's main Twitter page quoted Secretary-General Antonio Guterres as saying, "Climate change is undeniable". "It sends a combative signal to the rest of the world that America doesn't prioritize climate change and threatens to unravel the ambition of the entire deal".

Scientists say Earth is likely to reach more risky levels of warming sooner as a result of the president's decision because America contributes so much to rising temperatures. Calculations suggest withdrawal could result in emissions of up to 3 billion tons of additional carbon dioxide in the air a year - enough to melt ice sheets faster, raise seas higher and trigger more extreme weather.

According to The New York Times, the Trump administration can either request a formal withdrawal, which takes four years, or it could withdraw from the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change altogether. He has spent his first months in office working to delay and roll back federal regulations limiting greenhouse gas emissions while pledging to revive long-struggling USA coal mines. Germany's environment minister told reporters Friday "there will be no new deal with the United States" on climate change and predicted global climate will "survive" Trump's maximum presidential term of eight years.

Trump says the deal "disadvantages" the USA and is causing lost jobs and lower wages.

- With files from The Canadian Press.