Sunday, 19 November, 2017

House GOP leader suggested Putin was paying Trump

“I think Putin pays” Trump: Secret recording reveals Kevin McCarthy's 2016 joke to GOP colleagues The GOP House Majority Leader reportedly said aloud that Trump is on Putin's payroll
Nellie Chapman | 19 May, 2017, 06:36

A leading Republican was recorded previous year saying he believed US President Donald Trump was on Russian President Vladimir Putin's payroll.

McCarthy and House Speaker Paul Ryan's aides initially denied the story, the Post reported, which McCarthy said was because "no one even remembers it transpiring".

Ryan mentioned his meeting with Groysman, prompting Rodgers to ask: "How are things going in Ukraine?" according to the recording. By that point, McCarthy was already firmly in Trump's camp; Ryan endorsed him in early June. The fallback explanation has less presumptive credibility when the initial explanation has been debunked.

Both spokesmen for Ryan and McCarthy claimed the Russian Federation quip was a joke, nothing more. One of those times is when you're acknowledging that reality is weird. When McCarthy brought the hacking up, he claims the research obtained by the opposition on Trump had been delivered to Trump himself.

During an interview with NBC, McCarthy insisted he was trying to be amusing but did not succeed. He was describing an actual event that was true but so unusual it was amusing.

Dana Rohrabacher, who like Mr Trump is a Republican, is a long-time friend of Mr Putin.

He then made his alleged comments about who Putin pays - saying, "There's two people...there's two people".

Rohrabacher said he's talked to McCarthy since the story dropped, adding members of congress misspeak often, and his remark shouldn't be taken seriously. Rohrabacher is known in Congress for his fervent defenses of Putin and Putin's interests.

Rodgers: ... coming out of Russian Federation and Putin. No other coherent explanation could be found for his dogged insistence on a cause that had no merit whatsoever from the perspective of the United States.

Like many jokes, the humor here comes from the kernel of truth behind it: Trump acted as though he was under Russian influence, and it was reasonable to be anxious that, if Trump became president, he would put Russian interests ahead of American ones. Director James Comey to let go of the investigation into Michael Flynn's indisputable ties to Russian Federation - increasing President Donald Trump and his White House's exposure, Republican leaders have continued to stand by Trump.

Meanwhile, a new report reveals that Trump's campaign was in closer contact with Russian agents than previously thought: according to Reuters, there were at least another 18 exchanges between the Trump campaign and Russia that were not previously disclosed. I can't imagine it was pleasant for McCarthy and Ryan to watch their party nominate an intemperate man-child Russian stooge for president, and I understand why they would have wanted to blow off some steam.

Ryan: So he's saying they're doing this throughout Europe.

Ukrainian officials were unnerved by Trump's statements in support of Putin. NO LEAKS...[laughter]...all right?! "This is how we know we're a real family here", Mr. Ryan reportedly said.

"What's said in the family stays in the family", Ryan added. It is hard to know for sure. A more suitable option is the "the 25th Amendment", which gives Vice President Pence "and a majority of the cabinet" the power to remove Trump if they deem him "unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office".