Sunday, 23 September, 2018

White House downplays Trump's praise for Australian healthcare

White House downplays Trump's praise for Australian healthcare White House downplays Trump's praise for Australian healthcare
Stacy Diaz | 17 May, 2017, 13:57

The get-together with Turnbull was delayed because of Trump's hastily arranged White House celebration with fellow Republicans from the U.S. House of Representatives who narrowly passed a healthcare bill that would repeal and replace the 2010 Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

During a short press conference, Trump said: "It's going to be fantastic health care".

Trump didn't hesitate to praise the bill, "It's a very good bill right now. So maybe when we get to the Senate we should start off with looking at the Australian health care system", the longtime supporter of universal health care told CNN's Anderson Cooper. "On this special gathering, on this special night, we remember the courage of these men and every man, Australian and American, who fought in the Battle of the Coral Sea".

But under the GOP bill, that support might disappear, making health care accessible to a smaller group of people.

"The president has just said it".

The World Health Organization ranked the U.S.as 37th out of 191 countries on a study of overall national health system performance in 2016 - behind Australia, at 32, but well ahead of bottom-tier countries like Sierra Leone, Myanmar and Central African Republic.

The Vermont senator and former Democratic presidential hopeful continued his argument on Twitter on Saturday with a video explaining how Australia's universal health care system works. This year Canadian provinces will receive $37.1 billion CAD ($26.9 billion USD) from the country's federal government to pay for their health care system.

But the best part was Bernie Sanders happened to be watching, and like so many other observers, he just couldn't stop laughing. In the United States, on the other hand, both public and private costs rose from $7,680 to $9,450 per capita.

The health care reform that Trump wants to bring into law would leave more than 24 million people without health insurance, according to a report by the independent Congressional Budget Office. In 2015, approximately 28.4 million Americans under the age of 65 were uninsured.

House Republicans didn't even wait for the CBO to score its final version of a bill they passed that would remake one sixth of the economy and effect nearly every American.

Australia's healthcare system is run by the federal government, which Sanders quickly pointed out.

The two leaders answered questions from reporters, and at one point, Trump turned to Turnbull and complimented him on Australia's health care system.