Wednesday, 26 July, 2017

A look at the missiles North Korea displayed at parade

Soldiers in tanks take part in the parade Soldiers in tanks take part in the parade
Melinda Barton | 21 April, 2017, 17:28

Kim Jong Un has overseen three nuclear tests and a string of missile and rocket launches since taking over after the death of his father, dictator Kim Jong Il, in late 2011.

Near the birthplace of Kim Il Sung, a pilgrimage spot for North Koreans, commuters moved briskly on and off the subway, young women holding umbrellas walked by, clasping arms, while two children in blue school uniforms shuffled down the street holding a flower basket nearly their own size.

Unlike at some previous parades attended by Kim, there did not appear to be any a senior Chinese official in attendance.

North Korea invited the world's press into the country this week, as part of the celebrations for the 105th birth anniversary of its founder, Kim Il Sung. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un has appeared in a massive parade.

China seeks Russian Federation aid to "cool" situation China is seeking Russia's help to cool surging tensions over Pyongyang's nuclear ambitions, the country's foreign minister has told his Moscow counterpart, after Beijing warned of possible conflict over North Korea.

North Korea is ratcheting up already high tensions with a new display of military firepower, CBS News correspondent Ben Tracy reports.

North Korea shows off what are thought to be new ballistic missiles, and issues a grave warning to the United States, as it celebrates the 105th anniversary of the birth of state founder Kim Il Sung.

Pence told reporters near the Demilitarized Zone separating North and South Korea that President Donald Trump is hopeful that China will use its "extraordinary levers" to pressure the North to abandon its weapons.

Choe Ryong Hae, who some say is the second-most powerful official in North Korea, said in a speech that the country is ready to stand up to any threat posed by the United States.

The North Koreans use Sinpo shipyard for their submarine activity, and United States satellites have observed increased activity there in April, a U.S. official said at the time of the previous test.

But if the parade signaled a readiness for war, North Korea has long insisted that its goal is peace - and survival - with the growing arsenal a way to ensure that the government in Pyongyang is not easily overthrown.

It could "beat down enemies with the power of nuclear justice", he said, and was "prepared to respond to an all-out war with an all-out war". However, the vice minister of foreign affairs told Tracy that North Korea will eventually go through with that test at a time of their choosing.

"Trump is always making provocations with his aggressive words", Han said. Any fighting on the Korean Peninsula is likely to draw in China, which has repeatedly expressed concerns about a wave of refugees and the possible presence of US and South Korean troops on its border. Han said if the US shows any sign of "reckless" military aggression, Pyongyang is ready to launch a pre-emptive strike of its own.

Trump posted a tweet Tuesday in which he said the North is "looking for trouble" and reiterated his call for more pressure from Beijing, North Korea's economic lifeline, to clamp down on trade and strengthen its enforcement of United Nations sanctions to persuade Pyongyang to denuclearize.

Sinpo, where the launch took place, is the site of a North Korean submarine base and where the North has tested the submarine-launched ballistic missile (SLBM) it is developing.

Weapons analysts said they believed some of the missiles on display were new types of intercontinental ballistic missiles (ICBM).

North Korea has conducted five nuclear tests and a series of missile launches.

North Korean soldiers paraded large rockets covered by canisters that were rolled out in two different types of transporter erector launcher trucks, or TELs.

"North Korea is a liability to everybody and it's a threat not just to the United States, not just to South Korea, not just to Japan, not just to Russian Federation, but it's actually a threat to China as well", McFarland said Sunday on "Fox News Sunday".

The Japanese government says it has protested to North Korea over its latest attempted missile launch, but that the failed firing had no security impact on Japan.

The extended-range Scud missile in that earlier launch suffered an in-flight failure and fell into the sea off North Korea's east coast, according to US imagery and assessments.